Is Clinical Depression an Allergic Reaction?

Mast_cells

Interesting concept that researchers have been studying for some time: Is clinical depression an allergic reaction?

A study in 2008 showed that during manic episodes, pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-2, IL-4 and IL-6, were increased in comparison with healthy subjects. Patients in depressive episode showed only increased IL-6 levels. There were no significant differences in cytokine levels between patients in remission and healthy subjects, except for IL-4.1

A double- blind study in 2006 in German of 40 patients with a diagnosis of clinical showed more improvement in the half who took anti-inflammatory drugs for a certain time, vs those that didn’t. All patients showed some improvement, perhaps from placebo effect, but those treated with anti-inflammatories did better.2

In 1999 a study of 6836 people in the U.S., subjects with a history of any allergy were more likely to report low-back pain, to be diagnosed with major depression, and much more likely to have both major depression and low-back pain.3

Perhaps depression is a response to the world around us, on a micro level- such as dust, or a macro level- such as stress from daily living. Inflammation, the common allergic reaction, is seen in patients with bipolar disorder and depression.

Even as far back as 1930, it was thought there was some hereditary element to allergies.

 

asthma allergy

Who know, in the future, people prone to a depressed allergic reaction may carry some kind of inhaler, like those for asthma. Or anti-inflammatory drugs may become the new “anti-depressant”.

1Elisa Brietzke, Laura Stertz, Brisa Simões Fernandes, Marcia Kauer-Sant’Anna, Marcello Mascarenhas, Andréia Escosteguy Vargas, José Artur Chies, Flávio Kapczinskicorrespondenceemail (2008). Comparison of cytokine levels in depressed, manic and euthymic patients with bipolar disorder. Journal of Affective Disorders, 116, 3, 214–217.

2N Müller, M J Schwarz, S Dehning, A Douhe, A Cerovecki, B Goldstein-Müller, I Spellmann, G Hetzel, K Maino, N Kleindienst, H-J Möller, V Arolt and M Riedel.(2006).  The cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor celecoxib has therapeutic effects in major depression: results of a double-blind, randomized, placebo controlled, add-on pilot study to reboxetine. Molecular Psychiatry (2006) 11, 680–684

3Eric L. Hurwitz and Hal Morgenstern (1999).  Cross-Sectional Associations of Asthma, Hay Fever, and Other Allergies with Major Depression and Low-Back Pain among Adults Aged 20–39 Years in the United States. Am. J. Epidemiol. (1999) 150 (10): 1107-1116

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Resta’s Rules of Genetic Counseling

A reblog from Bob Resta- This is an excellent and funny summary of some of the challenges of genetics, genetic counseling and health care in general. My favorite one is #9.

The DNA Exchange

You will not find these pearls of wisdom in Psyche and Helix, Psychosocial Genetic Counseling, A Guide To Genetic Counseling, or the Journal of Genetic Counseling. I am certain that they will never be the source of correct responses on genetic counseling board certification exams. These insights are based on personal observations made during my 3+ decades of genetic counseling practice. There is almost no research to back them up but they are gospel truth nonetheless. Well, at least they seem true.

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1) All interactions with patients are primarily psychosocial encounters, no matter how much we or patients consciously or unconsciously try to focus on facts and figures.

2) All research studies are flawed in some way. Therefore, all facts, figures, and risk predictions that we so confidently quote are wrong, with the possible exception of Mendelian segregation ratios (but even there…). Quite often, several seemingly well designed studies…

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