23andMe Ordered by FDA to Stop Marketing Genetic Tests

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I’ve been on the fence about 23andMe’s personalized genetic tests.I like that it’s a cheap way to access your own DNA- which many of us may never have the opportunity to do. On the other hand, many of the gene allele interpretations are based on very small research studies that may not apply to the general population. The test has risk predictors for mental health conditions like schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression and alcholism. I have looked at the studies that 23andMe bases their intrepretations on, and I find them lacking. I would not recommend that anyone make decisions on treatment, medication, or personal life decisions such as having children, on such results.

23andMe is backed by Google, so obviously there is a lot of money behind the company. I think it is very important that the FDA takes this stand, and demonstrates to the American public that profit has to take a backseat to safety.

Alberto Gutierrez, director of the FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health, said in a letter to the company made public on Monday that 23andMe had failed to address concerns raised on multiple occasions since the agency began working with it on compliance in July 2009. He commented that the the FDA does not have any assurance that the firm has analytically or clinically validated the tests for its intended uses.

23andMe responded  “We recognize that we have not met the FDA’s expectations regarding timeline and communication regarding our submission,” the company said in a statement. “Our relationship with the FDA is extremely important to us and we are committed to fully engaging with them to address their concerns.”

23andMe has plans to start markeing to the public via televison. As far as I can see from the report, they will not be able to do this immediately.

Here is a link to more information:

http://www.theguardian.com/science/2013/nov/25/genetics-23andme-fda-marketing-pgs-screening

 

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Do People With Mental Illness Age Faster Than People Who Are Unaffected?

Last week I attended a talk by Dr. Owen Wolkowitz, psychiatrist and professor at UCSF Langley Porter Institute.  His answer to this question is “yes.”  He refers to mental illness as “disorders of the whole body.”

There is data that people with mental illness die, on an average, 25 years earlier than people in the general population.  30-40% of people with mental illness die of suicide or accidents, but the remaining 60% die of natural causes earlier than the general population.

There are some obvious reasons as to why:

1)      Poor lifestyle – smoking , drinking, illicit drug use, bad nutrition

2)      Poor access to healthcare, poor medication compliance, homelessness

3)      Medication side effects such as obesity, increased lipids

Less obvious are some of the behind the scenes factors, such as inflammation due to stress.

It is also possible that mental illness actually changes our DNA, in particular our telomeres. Telomeres are the pieces of DNA at the ends of the chromosomes. Each time a cell divides, it duplicates its chromosomes, and a little bit of the end of the chromosome is lost. At some point, too much information is lost, and instead of dividing, the cell dies. This is the aging process in a nutshell. We can’t have cells that live forever (that’s what happens in cancer, the mechanism gets screwed up and the cell keeps dividing forever.)  Telomerase, the enzyme that adds the telomeres to the end of the chromosome, can be measured in the blood, and can be used as a marker for aging.

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Studies have been done on telomeres of people with mental illness. Studies of people with depression show telomere shortening. Adults with early life trauma have shorter telomeres, demonstrating perhaps a “scar in the brain.”  There’s evidence that people with schizophrenia who take anti-psychotic meds have longer telomeres than people with schizophrenia who aren’t taking any medication- demonstrating a potential benefit of medication. It’s possible that anti-psychotics can have an effect by reducing inflammation and oxidative stress.

The good news is that telomeres can lengthen. Factors known to extend telomere length to a healthy level include exercise, dietary restraint, multivitamins, folate, Omega 3’s, stress management, statins, estrogen and social support. So while good nutrition, good sleep, exercise and avoidance of illicit drugs are good plans for everyone, they are especially important for people with mental illness, or people at risk for mental illness.

Link to article on telemore shortening:

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0006322306001363

High cost of drugs getting you down?

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Did you know that there’s now an injectable form of Abilify that lasts for about a month?  Did you know that if you don’t have insurance it costs $1000 per injection?

Wow.

I went to the meeting of the San Francisco chapter of NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness) last night for a discussion about medication.  Dr. Ralph Fenn was on hand to answer questions and provide information.  He gave us two great websites to check out

This site compares costs of drugs so you can find the lowest price:

http://www.prescriptiondiscount123.com/check-discount-drug-cost

This site has programs that can assist if you need medication but can’t afford it:

http://www.needymeds.org/indices/pap.htm

For patient assistance programs you generally need to make less than $28,000 a year, which I know is hard to live on in San Francisco, but It doesn’t require that you be on MediCal or MediCare. Check it out.

On a genetic side note: I asked Dr. Fenn if he thought genetic testing for drug response was appropriate.  He agreed and said if he were the patient he would even consider paying out of pocket for it.

Photo:

© Alexey Lisovoy | Dreamstime Stock Photos